Wildlife Expeditions


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India is one of the best places in world for tigers, one horned rhino’s, Black Bucks, Asiatic elephants, wild buffalo’s, wild dogs, Crocodiles.

Travelling with a team of experts who had already travelled length and breadth of the country is a unique experience.

Total Number of Recommended Days: 22

Model Of travel: Jeep, Car, Airplane

Expected Species: Tigers, Rhino’s, Leopard, Wild Dogs, Indian Gaur, Swamp Deer’s, Elephants,Gibbons

200+ species of Birds, This is wildlife specific trip for Birding trip please check our birds trip.

Places to be covered: Kaziranga, Nameri, Maharastra, Chambal

Recommended Month of the year: Oct to June

Note: July, August, and September – Most of the Game reserves are closed.

The wildlife in India comprises a mix of species of different types of organisms. Apart from a handful of the major farm animals such as cows, buffaloes, goats, poultry, and camels, India has an amazingly wide variety of animals native to the country. It is home to Bengal tigers, Indian lions, deer, pythons, wolves, foxes, bears, crocodiles, wild dogs, monkeys, snakes, antelope species, varieties of bison and the Asian elephant. The region’s rich and diverse wildlife is preserved in 120+ national parks, 18 Bio-reserves and 500+ wildlife sanctuaries across the country. India has some of the most biodiverse regions of the world and hosts three of the world’s 35 biodiversity hotspots – or treasure-houses – that are the Western Ghats, the Eastern Himalayas and Indo-Burma. Since India is home to a number of rare and threatened animal species, wildlife management in the country is essential to preserve these species. India is one of the seventeen megadiverse countries. According to one study, India along with other 16 mega diverse countries is home to about 60-70% of the world’s biodiversity.

India, lying within the Indomalaya ecozone, is home to about 7.6% of all mammalian, 12.6% of avian, 6.2% of reptilian, and 6.0% of flowering plant species. Many ecoregions, such as the shola forests, also exhibit extremely high rates of endemism; overall, 33% of Indian plant species are endemic. India’s forest cover ranges from the tropical rainforest of the Andaman Islands, Western Ghats, and Northeast India to the coniferous forest of the Himalaya. Between these extremes lie the sal-dominated moist deciduous forest of eastern India; teak-dominated dry deciduous forest of central and southern India; and the babul-dominated thorn forest of the central Deccan and western Gangetic plain. Important Indian trees include the medicinal neem, widely used in rural Indian herbal remedies. The pipal fig tree, shown on the seals of Mohenjo-daro, shaded the Gautama Buddha as he sought enlightenment.

 

India has the largest population of Indian / Asiatic elephants.

Many Indian species are descendants of taxa originating in Gondwana, to which India originally belonged. Peninsular India’s subsequent movement towards, and collision with, the Laurasian landmass set off a mass exchange of species. However, volcanism and climatic change 20 million years ago caused the extinction of many endemic Indian forms. Soon thereafter, mammals entered India from Asia through two zoogeographical passes on either side of the emerging Himalaya. As a result, among Indian species, only 12.6% of mammals and 4.5% of birds are endemic, contrasting with 45.8% of reptiles and 55.8% of amphibians. Notable endemics are the Nilgiri leaf monkey and the brown and carmine Beddome’s toad of the Western Ghats. India contains 172, or 2.9%, of IUCN-designated threatened species. These include the Asian elephant, the Asiatic lion, the Bengal tiger, the Indian rhinoceros, the mugger crocodile, and the Indian white-rumped vulture, which suffered a near-extinction from ingesting the carrion of diclofenac-treated cattle.

 

In recent decades, human encroachment has posed a threat to India’s wildlife; in response, the system of national parks and protected areas, first established in 1935, was substantially expanded. In 1972, India enacted the Wildlife Protection Act and Project Tiger to safeguard crucial habitat; further federal protections were promulgated in the 1980s. Along with over 515 wildlife sanctuaries, India now hosts 18 biosphere reserves, 9 of which are part of the World Network of Biosphere Reserves; 26 wetlands are registered under the Ramsar Convention.

 

The varied and rich wildlife of India has had a profound impact on the region’s popular culture. The common name for wilderness in India is jungle, which was adopted into the English language. The word has been also made famous in The Jungle Book by Rudyard Kipling. India’s wildlife has been the subject of numerous other tales and fables such as the Panchatantra.

 

Please send an email to info@indiansavanna.com for below details or you can ask other queries

  • Species covered.
  • How can I book?
  • I Want to Travel solo can this be possible.
  • I am travelling with my wife, Can we both cover this trip exclusively.
  • What is the maximum number of participants allowed in this trip?
  • Detail day wise schedule.
  • Mode of payments for International Participants.
  • List of Expected species.
  • Can We Extend our trip with a week or more?

 

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